MyLife

It's just a branch of my main blog that's an aggregate of my thoughts and pictures. It's going to be more of my artistic outlet than just expressing my thoughts and ideals and really just a way to start over and what not.

Online Video is Nothing Like TV (But it Will Be if We Can't Think Differently)

fishingboatproceeds:

kenyatta:

edwardspoonhands:

WALL OF TEXT ABOUT ONLINE VIDEO!

Everything about online video is different from television (aside from the fact that lots of images are displayed in sequence in order to create the illusion of movement.)

The way the content is made is different, the mindset of the audience is different, the way social structures and fandoms are built is different, the kind of engagement is different, the barrier to entry is non-existent, the rate of change is at least doubled.

But humans are not good at thinking about things differently. Something new exists and, unless we are very young, we attempt to put it in an existing box…or some combination of existing boxes. Online video looks like television, so let’s create “Networks.” Let’s call the page of each creator a “Channel.” Let’s call the thing they do a “Show.” And the people themselves are “Stars.”

Of course this is what we do…creating new words is a hassle, especially when you’re trying to convince existing structures (like your mom, Hollywood executives, and Madison Avenue) that this thing is legitimate and interesting. So you use those old boxes. 

The problem is, the more we use those old boxes, the more everything starts to look like the thing that came before it. 

If we call collections of YouTube channels “Networks” everyone thinks about them like they’re Networks (especially in legacy media.) Then eventually creators start thinking about them as “online TV networks” when really, the needs of online video creators are completely different from the needs of TV creators. 

Suddenly, online video starts looking more like TV not because it should or anyone wants it to, but just because we lack the collective imagination to think of it differently. 

This is an old problem…and not one that can be completely avoided. People aren’t very adaptable. It’s like complaining that it snows in Montana…it’s so expensive to plow the streets, and there are more car accidents, it’s a drain on the economy! But, like, you can’t make it SNOW LESS, that’s ridiculous. 

But to some extent (and maybe not a huge extent) you can change social structures and you can change people. Not to match precisely what online video would be in it’s purest state, but to let some of its unique properties shine through. This will happen no matter what, but I think it will happen /more/ if we’re conscious about it…AND if we put people who actually understand it in charge of some of its more influential structures (YouTube, MCNs, Awards Shows.)

But that’s not what we’re doing. For a few years, YouTube has been led by a guy from Hollywood…so has Maker Studios…so has AwesomenessTV. YouTube is now in the hands of a stronger CEO who is at least from the tech world, which has much less in common with online video than TV does.

That might seem like a bad thing, but I don’t think it is. I think coming at new media with fresh eyes is much better than coming at it with pre-defined boxes. Thinking, “Oh, I see, so this is kinda like a channel…but different in a few ways,” gives you a much less accurate picture than thinking, “This is like nothing I’ve ever seen before…what exactly is it?” 

I (and probably you) came at online video with entirely fresh eyes. I knew nothing about hollywood structures or the roles that networks or agents or awards or channels played in the creation of media. I knew media existed, but the structures that surrounded them were entirely unknown and opaque to me. 

But most people in the online video business did not enter with that innocence, and I think that’s too bad. There are very few people who understand online video solely within the framework of online video in this industry, especially people who have differentiated themselves and gained enough experience to not only /be/ experts, but to be recognized as experts (which are two very different things.)

We’re headed into a world where the people who really get it are getting old enough to differentiate themselves and bring both authenticity and expertise into this industry, but it’s a bit of a battle at the moment…especially because a lot of the bigger companies have already got it into their heads that TV and online video really are very similar. 

And if they think that for long enough, my fear is that eventually, it will become true. Not because it is, but simply because we lacked imagination. 

So if you’re into this…figure out ways to differentiate yourself as an expert who should be recognized as such…then please, send me your resume.

I LOVE THIS POST edwardspoonhands!!! (bold emph and italics mine) Change the world! Go work for Hank!

I also love it. Go work for Hank. (Or go work for Kenyatta!)

Let’s make the Flubber movie cover the most reblogged picture on Tumblr.

dean-of-house-winchester:

insanitys-love:

mymompickedthisurl:

thewinchesterswagger:

image

HOW IS THIS THE FIRST TIME I’VE SEEN THIS IT’S ALMOST AT 10 MILLION WTF

Yes let’s do it for him.

This has over 12 million notes in less than six hours. And that’s just a single portion of people on a single website.
Can you even imagine all the people remembering Robin Williams today?

(Source: mspandrew, via perks-of-being-a-gayflower)

injellyfish:

ahkmenra-h:

hellabitcoins:

sansaspark:

magconbabe-matt:

This shit better work

HAH I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND LOOK WHAT I GOT FROM MY DAD TODAY OUT OF THE BLUE


what if we all got paper lol

GUYS I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND I JUST GOT $150 

I am not even kidding but I am reblogging this twice in a row because I just got $275.

injellyfish:

ahkmenra-h:

hellabitcoins:

sansaspark:

magconbabe-matt:

This shit better work

HAH I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND LOOK WHAT I GOT FROM MY DAD TODAY OUT OF THE BLUE

what if we all got paper lol
GUYS I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND I JUST GOT $150 

I am not even kidding but I am reblogging this twice in a row because I just got $275.

(via gambler-x)

mythandrists:

This is a masterpost of Gothic literature, a genre popular in the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe (and to a lesser extent in America), which combined horror, fantasy, and Romanticism. The list is organised by genre and date. All texts are public-domain and are available online via the links provided. Happy reading, and feel free to ask if there’s anything you’d like me to add.
Novels and Novellas:
Horace Walpole: The Castle of Otranto (1764)
Friedrich Schiller: The Ghost-Seer (1781)
Anne Radcliffe: The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794)
Matthew Gregory Louis: The Monk (1796)
Mary Shelley: Frankenstein (1818)
Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey (parody, 1818)
John William Polidori: The Vampyre (1819)
Charlotte Bronte: Jane Eyre (1847)
Emily Bronte: Wuthering Heights (1847)
Edgar Allen Poe: The Light-House (unfinished, 1849)
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu: Carmilla (1872)
Robert Louis Stevenson: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)
Theodor Storm: The Rider on the White Horse (1888)
Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891)
Bram Stoker: Dracula (1897)
Gaston Leroux: The Phantom of the Opera (1911)
H.P. Lovecraft: The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath (1927), The Shadow Over Innsmouth (1936)
Short Stories:
Washington Irving: “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1820)
Edgar Allen Poe: “The Fall of the House of Usher" (1839), "The Man of the Crowd" (1840), "The Masque of the Red Death" (1842), "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1842-1843), "The Tell-Tale Heart" (1843) [You can find a complete index of Poe’s works here.]
Robert W. Chambers: The King in Yellow (short story collection, 1895)
H.P. Lovecraft: “The Moon-Bog" (1926), "The Music of Erich Zann" (1922), "Herbert West - Reanimator" (1922), "The Lurking Fear" (1923), "The Rats in the Walls" (1924), "The Dunwich Horror" (1929) [You can find a complete index of Lovecraft’s works here.]
Poetry:
Samuel Taylor Coleridge: “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (1798), "Christabel" (1800)
John Keats: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci" (1819), "Isabella, or the Pot of Basil" (1820)
Edgar Allen Poe: “Lenore" (1843), "The Raven" (1845), "Annabel Lee" (1849)
Emily Bronte: “A Death-Scene" (1846), "Honour’s Martyr" (1846)

mythandrists:

This is a masterpost of Gothic literature, a genre popular in the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe (and to a lesser extent in America), which combined horror, fantasy, and Romanticism. The list is organised by genre and date. All texts are public-domain and are available online via the links provided. Happy reading, and feel free to ask if there’s anything you’d like me to add.

Novels and Novellas:

Short Stories:

Poetry:

(via angrynerdyblogger)

dailylifeofadisneyfreak:

books-on-tables:

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

mrbluechalk:

radioactivepapertowns:

wizard-me-timbers:

I totally remember watching this as a kid and thinking that looked like the most delicious biscuit/cookie in the world

me too!

when in reality was’t it a ritz cracker dipped in water?

THAT’S CREME A LA CREME A LA EDGAR YOU IGNORANT SLUT

every so often I sometimes get a mug of milk, add a splash of vanilla extract, a spoonful of sugar, and a sprinkle of cinnamon and heat it in the microwave and have it with Ritz Crackers and pretend it’s Creme A La Creme A La Edgar and it’s seriously just the best.

I JUST MADE THAT MYSELF AND AM CURRENTLY HAVING RITZ CRACKERS WITH IT AND LEMME TELL YOU THIS SHIT IS DELICIOUS

SOMEONE FOUND THE RECIPE TO CREME A LA CREME A LA EDGAR

(Source: fydisneymisfits, via the-young-writer-gg)

thebluechicory:

General Information
This is a bushy little perennial and very winter hardy. It grows well in zones 5 to 9 to about one to three feet tall. Leaves are small, stalkless, opposite and pale bluish green growing up long brown stems. Upon careful examination, oil glands are visible in the leaves as small dots. The red oil may stain fingers if you rub the leaves or flowers between them. It has bright yellow flowers from mid to late summer. Fruit is a 3-celled capsule with many brown seeds. Fragrance is similar to turpentine.
It is a native to Europe, but grows wild in open places in the US as well.
It is listed as a noxious weed in many countries and livestock that feed on it can suffer from miscarriage, photosensitivity and depressed nervous system.
History and Folklore
St. John’s Wort has been used in medicine for over 2.400 years. It was used in ancient Greece and prescribed by Hippocrates and others for insanity, among other problems. It was also used in the Crusades to treat battle wounds.
It is associated with St. John the Baptist. It was gathered on St. John’s Day and soaked in olive oil to create an anointing oili called the “Blood of Christ”. It is said that the red sap “bleeds” in August on the day when St. John was beheaded.
The ancient name Fuga Daemonum (Scare Devil) and the Latin name Hypericum(“over” + “apparition”) attests to its usefulness in driving away evil spirits. The latter may also refer to the fact that it was hung over religious icons. It was hung in the home, and carried as a talisman. It was also used to protect from lightening strikes.
On legend says that if you step on a St. John’s Wort plant, you will be stolen away by afaerie horse.
St. John’s Wort was also used for divination of romance and longevity. St. John’s Wort was hung over the beds of the members of a household to divine their longevity. The sprig that was most wilted the next morning indicated who would die the soonest. Keeping a sprig under your pillow is said to grant you a vision of St. John who will promise that you will live another year. If no such vision comes, however…expect you will soon die.
All of these should, of course, be done on Midsummer or st-john-s-eve.
It is traditionally burned in the Midsummer Fires. Flowers brought into the house on Midsummer Day are said to protect the household from a myriad misfortunes, including invasion by evil spirits, the evil eye, illness and fire.
Propagation
Propagate by runners in the autumn or by seeds in the spring.
Average soil, partial to full sun.
Plants will need to be replaced after 5 years or so, but will spread if not checked. It is a very vigorous grower, spreading by both seeds and runners and should be kept in a pot or raised bed.
Harvesting & Storage
It is traditionally harvested on St. John’s Day (June 24th) or Midsummer’s day, early in the day after the dew has dried. Harvest soon after flowering.
Otherwise, harvest flowers and leaves as needed.
Magical Attributes
St. John’s Wort is linked with the Sun and Leo, Midsummer’s Day, or St. John’s Day.
St. John’s Wort can be added to the fires for Midsummer celebrations and used to make garlands. The infused oil might be useful for an anointing oil for Midsummer rituals andexorcism. It’s bloody red color also lends it well to death and rebirth rituals and celebrations of women’s mysteries.
It can also be used for smudging during rituals of exorcism, especially of poltergeists.
Household Use
Flowers are used to produce a yellow dye. The stem produces a red dye.
In the garden St. John’s Wort attracts bees. It does not produce nector so few adult butterflies are attracted to it. The Grey Hairstreak butterfly’s larvae feeds on its seeds and the the Gray Half-Spot moth’s larvae feeds on its foliage, so it is still be a useful addition to a butterfly garden in regions where these lepidoptera species are native.
The flowered stems are great for weaving into wreathes.
Healing Attributes
The most popular use of St. John’s Wort medicinally is for depression. Studies of various constituents of this herb suggest that there is indeed something to the claim of its effectiveness against mild depression. It does not seem to be at all effective against severe depression.
St. John’s Wort tea is also used for rheumatism, neuralgia, sciatica, shingles and symptoms of menopause. It is also a soothing muscle relaxer for when you overdo it (not for chronic problems).
The oil rubbed into joints may ease rheumatism. It is also used for minor wounds, burns and to help fade scars.
Infuse olive oil for topical use by stuffing a wide-mouthed jar with herb, then covering with olive oil and sealing. Place in a sunny window and shake a few times a day for six weeks. It will be bright red when done.
Culinary Use
Makes a pleasant, slightly bitter tea.

thebluechicory:

General Information

This is a bushy little perennial and very winter hardy. It grows well in zones 5 to 9 to about one to three feet tall. Leaves are small, stalkless, opposite and pale bluish green growing up long brown stems. Upon careful examination, oil glands are visible in the leaves as small dots. The red oil may stain fingers if you rub the leaves or flowers between them. It has bright yellow flowers from mid to late summer. Fruit is a 3-celled capsule with many brown seeds. Fragrance is similar to turpentine.

It is a native to Europe, but grows wild in open places in the US as well.

It is listed as a noxious weed in many countries and livestock that feed on it can suffer from miscarriage, photosensitivity and depressed nervous system.

History and Folklore

St. John’s Wort has been used in medicine for over 2.400 years. It was used in ancient Greece and prescribed by Hippocrates and others for insanity, among other problems. It was also used in the Crusades to treat battle wounds.

It is associated with St. John the Baptist. It was gathered on St. John’s Day and soaked in olive oil to create an anointing oili called the “Blood of Christ”. It is said that the red sap “bleeds” in August on the day when St. John was beheaded.

The ancient name Fuga Daemonum (Scare Devil) and the Latin name Hypericum(“over” + “apparition”) attests to its usefulness in driving away evil spirits. The latter may also refer to the fact that it was hung over religious icons. It was hung in the home, and carried as a talisman. It was also used to protect from lightening strikes.

On legend says that if you step on a St. John’s Wort plant, you will be stolen away by afaerie horse.

St. John’s Wort was also used for divination of romance and longevity. St. John’s Wort was hung over the beds of the members of a household to divine their longevity. The sprig that was most wilted the next morning indicated who would die the soonest. Keeping a sprig under your pillow is said to grant you a vision of St. John who will promise that you will live another year. If no such vision comes, however…expect you will soon die.

All of these should, of course, be done on Midsummer or st-john-s-eve.

It is traditionally burned in the Midsummer Fires. Flowers brought into the house on Midsummer Day are said to protect the household from a myriad misfortunes, including invasion by evil spirits, the evil eye, illness and fire.

Propagation

Propagate by runners in the autumn or by seeds in the spring.

Average soil, partial to full sun.

Plants will need to be replaced after 5 years or so, but will spread if not checked. It is a very vigorous grower, spreading by both seeds and runners and should be kept in a pot or raised bed.

Harvesting & Storage

It is traditionally harvested on St. John’s Day (June 24th) or Midsummer’s day, early in the day after the dew has dried. Harvest soon after flowering.

Otherwise, harvest flowers and leaves as needed.

Magical Attributes

St. John’s Wort is linked with the Sun and Leo, Midsummer’s Day, or St. John’s Day.

St. John’s Wort can be added to the fires for Midsummer celebrations and used to make garlands. The infused oil might be useful for an anointing oil for Midsummer rituals andexorcism. It’s bloody red color also lends it well to death and rebirth rituals and celebrations of women’s mysteries.

It can also be used for smudging during rituals of exorcism, especially of poltergeists.

Household Use

Flowers are used to produce a yellow dye. The stem produces a red dye.

In the garden St. John’s Wort attracts bees. It does not produce nector so few adult butterflies are attracted to it. The Grey Hairstreak butterfly’s larvae feeds on its seeds and the the Gray Half-Spot moth’s larvae feeds on its foliage, so it is still be a useful addition to a butterfly garden in regions where these lepidoptera species are native.

The flowered stems are great for weaving into wreathes.

Healing Attributes

The most popular use of St. John’s Wort medicinally is for depression. Studies of various constituents of this herb suggest that there is indeed something to the claim of its effectiveness against mild depression. It does not seem to be at all effective against severe depression.

St. John’s Wort tea is also used for rheumatism, neuralgia, sciatica, shingles and symptoms of menopause. It is also a soothing muscle relaxer for when you overdo it (not for chronic problems).

The oil rubbed into joints may ease rheumatism. It is also used for minor wounds, burns and to help fade scars.

Infuse olive oil for topical use by stuffing a wide-mouthed jar with herb, then covering with olive oil and sealing. Place in a sunny window and shake a few times a day for six weeks. It will be bright red when done.

Culinary Use

Makes a pleasant, slightly bitter tea.

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

thepreciousthing:

adire-adire:

victorysunshine:

goldfish-kisses:

geek-in-a-box:

martiemcfly:

WHY ARENT THERE ADULT-SIZED PLAYGROUNDS

LIKE EVERYTHING IS THE SAME AS A KIDS PLAYGROUND

BUT BIGGER

WHY DO WE NOT HAVE THOSE

theme parks. just. theme parks.

but u have to pay for theme parks

that’s the adult part

son of a bitch

ladies and gentlemen, behold

the St. Louis City Museum:

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Playground for adults and children.

They even serve alcohol.

I know where we’re going guys

(via the-young-writer-gg)